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20121224
20130101
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CSPAN 7
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
in 1967, where i met steve schneider who was a student at that time. and, if i could just say a couple words about steve, it's kind of -- it's ironic that i'm getting the steve schneider award because we could not have been more opposite. [laughter] he had the gift of gab, you know, he's so articulate as a student and as a postdoc. so when i -- then i went off to the netherlands where i met my wife, who -- then i came -- who eventually became my wife, but i -- when i came back to the institute for space studies, steve was in a postdoc at the institute. and, as i say, we couldn't have been more opposite. he -- as i was this tactiturn midwest scientist who wanted to do the numbers and do my science and not talk about it, but he would come to my door, he would be in the door of my office and talking to me and, eventually, i would turn around and be working on my desk and he -- somehow, he couldn't take the hint. [laughter] but when anniek who was then my girlfriend, would visit me, then she would see that, well, i really didn't want to talk to steve. so she would talk to him, and that was
? >> one thing that steve schneider always emphasized to students is that if is worth thinking about the matter for which apply to climate change. coral harbour is one which is an urgent one. but certainly apartheid or civil-rights movement were things that are every bit as urgent where the time skills are much longer and the accuracy takes on how you talk to people. >> i think we can learn a lot from the past. look at the issue of slavery. we were the bad guys than also. it was the foundation of the economy. people were making the same argument at them. it was not so bad. it would destroy the economy if we got rid of it. i think people have a lot to learn. there are many examples we can build on from the past year -- in the past. admitting that we have a problem is the first step. >> slavery -- abolishing slavery did not room economy. -- did not ruin the economy. >> right. >> nobody objects to a medical researcher over what we need to do to save lives. that when a clear researcher says what we have to do to save lives, people get upset. >> one of the things that i tried to stress in
capital, rick santelli, steve guilfoyle on the floor of the exchange with us as well. let's see. let's start with you, mr. grinch. you sell on any strengths, even now, even if we get a deal? >> well, fundamental analysis is thrown out the window. this obviously is a headline-driven market. any time you're hearing about something that's going to take place, any hint at any type of negotiation, any type of a deal, the markets tend to respond. right now i think the markets are calling their bluff right now. we're not expecting a lot out of what's taking place in washington at this moment. here's a thing, guys. even if there is a deal, it's going to be tough. you'll have a knee jerk reaction. markets should be rallying, might be a great opportunity to sell into strength, because when you look behind the curtain of any deal that's going to happen, it's going to be remarkably bad for the economy. >> austerity on the way. >> absolutely. >> whatever we're looking at. >> talking about spending. the whole conversation has been about tax hikes. i mean, you can't -- you're talking about how many
: who is steve rogers who you interview here? >> guest: steve rogers from chicago is a professor at the kellogg school of management at northwestern university. >> host: what was his connection with president obama? >> guest: like many african americans, businessmen and leaders who i interviewed, he was an early backer and supporter of obama. after obama lost a congressional primary to bobby rush in 2000, rush is a former black panther, now a congressman, he was deeply in debt, he went around looking for people to donate money to his cause and steve rogers, very successful businessman at that time before he became a professor gave him $6,000 to pay off some of his personal debts. in return obama promised that he would visit steve rogers and if he won a u.s. senate seat and speak to them so he did win the u.s. senate seat. rogers never heard from him. he called up and asked obama what he come? obama said i am too busy. i am getting phone calls from warren buffett and steve jobs and bill gates and all these important people and rogers said you promised and obama told him you are no
representative congressman steve latourette. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> washington finally seems ready to ring in the new year with a deal that averts the fiscal cliff. it only has taken 517 days to reach this point. what a waste of time. from the cnn money newsroom in new york, i'm ali velshi. this is your money. with only hours to go, president obama says a deal between democrats and republicans is, quote, within reach as america ticks closer to the fiscal cliff at midnight. >> they are close, but they're not there yet. and one thing we can count on with respect to this congress is that if there is even one second left before you have to do what you're supposed to do, they will use that last second. >> duown to the wire. if you thought the fiscal cliff snuck up on congress, the
department public information officer, steve huffman. mr. huffman, thank you for joining us. one of the churches, trinity episcopal suffered a lot of damage. part of the roof is gone, front part of the parish is gone. and they went through a $1 million renovation. thank goodness it didn't happen when the church was packed. as daylight breaks what is the biggest challenge in terms of cleanup? >> we had public works crews working throughout the night and alabama power crews working to restore power in those affected areas. these guys -- i mean, unfortunately, this was not anything new to us. now, tornadoes are, but we're used to hurricanes, so we deal with power outages and things like that in emergencies such as this. our guys are well trained to respond to the types of incidents? >> how rare is it to have these tornadoes at this time of the year and nobody hurt, so you must have had pretty good warnings out there? >> we have been told a couple of days ahead of time to expect some severe weather to include tornadoes, and i think everybody was prepared for that. of course, we were
for the most expensive co-op ever sold in new york. and number four, steve wynn. he bought this luxurious condo. also in new york city. $70 million. the apartment which was once the hotel's ballroom has 14 rooms and over 10,000 square feet of space. whic is massive for new york. number three, we are still in new york were a russian billionaire bought a penthouse on central park west for $89. he reportedly bought it for his college age daughter to use when she's in town. i hope she's countable there. number two, this lavish new york city duplex penthouse with jetliner views of central park. the 11,000 square-foot penthouse was originally listed for $110 million. but the buyer is anonymous. i can tell you it is. the most expensive home by 2012, look at this. it is in montana. the billionaire owner of the st. louis rams bought this range. the final sale price not yet revealed. but if he paid nearly 1.5 million asking price, it would have been by far the biggest residential real estate sale in the u.s. this year. i could use a ranch house. that would be nice. coming up, forget the fiscal cliff. a s
congress steve la turret of ohio, a member of the appropriations committee. thanks for coming "outfront." with this plan that the president's put forward, the scaled-down plan which would keep taxes low for 98% of americans, raising them for folks over 250, extending unemployment benefits. would you vote for that as an alternative to going over the fiscal cliff? >> i would have voted just to extend the tax cuts for 99.8% or whatever it was of americans that was john boehner's plan "b." a couple of things are either being misreported or inaccurately reported because what gets in the way of the president's plan is the constitution of the united states. and the good thing about this meeting is that the focus is now firmly on the united states senate where it should have been all these months. the house acted a long time ago to extend all the tax cuts and take care of sequestration. the senate has given speeches. >> you're referring to the fact that revenue issues are supposed to generate in the house. right now, both speaker boehner and the president say it's between reid and mcconnell whi
of late senator inouye. this morning's paper. back to your phone calls here. steve in indiana. democratic caller. caller: religion should have nothing to do with politics. if religion -- if you let religion in, then you are going to end up like iran or afghanistan. look at what happens in them countries. they tell you what you can believe and stuff, and that is not the way things should be. host: pensacola, florida. republican caller. caller: in response to an earlier caller about thomas jefferson being a secularist -- he actually was a declared christian. he believed in christian principles. and most of his politics were used in an 1892 court decision, supreme court decision that says 9-0 that this country was founded on christian principles. it didn't mean that it was freedom from religion. it was freedom of religion. we are a christian country. we are not like, as the last caller says, the failed governments of iran and iraq because our religion. those are terrorist religions. ours is based on the love and piece of jesus christ. host: markets from pensacolam fromarcus from pensacola. r
is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle- down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working incr greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a
to tax our imports in our country. the whole thing with steve jobs, he created the apple computer in his garage in california. if steve jobs was born in china, he would not even have a garage. we do not do enough for the people of this country or the people in a position to create jobs. data reinvest and i do not think that they should get tax breaks. creating jobs here, not overseas. host: joshua gordon? guest: i think a part of your frustration, many talk about fixing it in a mutual way. which had nothing to the deficit discussion and does not help to make lowering the deficits any easier. there are some things we need to change. in general we need to realize that if we set the country on the right path and make the right investments in technology and education, making sure we do not cut the necessary programs to do the growth, you have to make that a priority. we will be able to grow with the global economy. manufacturing has already come back to some degree. i know that apple is moving a couple of production facilities back to the united states from china. the real key is making sure
, including making it possible for us to hire such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of around 2% -- the conventional wisdom was that should -- that this president should not be reelected. as you take a look at what happened two weeks ago, how do you assess this? >> let me just say first that i made a very good living and politics betting against conventional wisdom. it is a general principle of mine that the conventional wisdom is almost always wrong and it was wrong here. it was wrong here because what we often do in political circles and journalism is that we look at what happened in the last election or pas
. as the deadline for the fiscal cliff does loom, what does it peen if your money if we do not get a deal? steve liesman has more on that. >> we talk about a lot of these big numbers that are out there and we don't talk about what it means to individuals. so let me see if i can break down the big numbers into something that might mean something to individual people here. $620 billion, that's the number that's the total revenue increases and spending cuts. about $130 billion of the automatic cuts that john harwood was just talking about, talking about trying to ally for a little while. 1920. that's if you break it down by every man, woman and child in america. that's the per capita fiscal cliff effect. but that effects a lot of people differently here. $26.2 million. that's the number of americans that will be caught by the amt, the alter naf tax system, unless congress comes up with a patch and that's part of the whole fiscal cliff effect. come on over here, we'll show you more. 2.1 million, that's the number of long term unemployed americans who will lose the extended benefits again if there's
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)